Flat Files at OyG: 2020 Open Call

Current Exhibition

Main Space

Image: Cameron Granger   Before I Let Go   (still), Video, 2019

Image: Cameron Granger Before I Let Go (still), Video, 2019

Open Call 2019 Recipient: Cameron Granger

September 14 - October 13 2019

In 1995 Antwan Patton & André Benjamin—Outkast, outcasts—stood against the world.

Because at that time, you see, all eyes were either to the East or the West, but these kids were from the South, so believe me when I say that when those two kids from the South were named best new artists at the ‘95 Source Awards, the room tore itself apart at its very seams.

If you watch the footage today you’ll probably hear the booing first. Massive, as if it could push on through whatever screen you were watching it on. If you stay longer though, you’ll see the two artists, making their way through the crowd and to the stage where, standing tall, unshaken, and side by side, André would assure us all that—no—where André would declare that:

“The south got something to say.”

I guess i’m thinking of Antwan, standing alongside his nigga, eyes trained forward, ready to defend him against whatever may come from that moment on. I guess i’m thinking of my own niggas, with their eyes trained forward past me, ready to do the same.

“Before I Let Go” is an exhibition of new video and text based work from Cameron Granger. It’s
dedicated to the wonderful gift of being seen by someone we love, and the life that gift can bring.

Cameron Granger came up in Cleveland, Ohio alongside his mother, Sandra, inheriting both a love of soul music, and a certain way of apologizing too much. A 2017 resident of the Skowhegan School of Painting & Sculpture, his work explores his place in, and role as a product of American history and its media. His most recent projects include “Ten Toes Down” at the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago, “Pearl” a body of collaborative works with his mother at Ctrl+Shft in Oakland, and “A library, for you” a traveling community library

 

The Skirt 

The Skirt Open Call 2019 Recipient: KT Duffy

September 14 - November 17, 2019

Image:   And I Can’t Say That I’ll Miss My Human Form,   2018, Foam, acrylic, plywood, tablets, USB cables, LED monitors, media players, custom software, vinyl, Dimensions Variable, pictured 16’ x 23’ x 13’  Link to video here

Image: And I Can’t Say That I’ll Miss My Human Form, 2018, Foam, acrylic, plywood, tablets, USB cables, LED monitors, media players, custom software, vinyl, Dimensions Variable, pictured 16’ x 23’ x 13’
Link to video here

"The Ways We Record the Universe Are Evidence of Our Own Primitive Nature"

Ortega y Gasset Projects is pleased to announce The Ways We Record the Universe Are Evidence of Our Own Primitive Nature, the NYC debut of artist KT Duffy, the recipient of our 2019 Open Call in The Skirt.

Presenting in The Skirt, KT Duffy’s The Ways We Record the Universe Are Evidence of Our Own Primitive Nature magnifies moments of interaction and genesis within a series of speculative microcosms to propose an alternative modality, where no entity is bound to a singular device, reality, or substance. The title of the exhibition is taken from a line in Jeff Vandermeer's "Annihilation Trilogy" whose main character is an invading biological entity which can neither be defined or contained. With the integration of digital fabrication and automated systems, Duffy creates an installation that recedes into the distance, disappears into the ground, and distorts the space around it. There is an implication of infinity that is emphasized in the modular aspects of the work and through visual mashups. The amalgamation of the physical sculptural aspects, automation, and color intensity, lend to the all encompassing effects of Duffy’s work. Duffy creates an environment in which the micro and macro coexist, and this conjures the viewers’ sensibility and awareness of the body seen on a molecular and ambient level.

As an educator, Duffy seeks to demystify coding and technology for creatives, centering those underrepresented in STEAM fields. STEAM stands for Science, Technology, Engineering And Mathematics. The installation demands the interaction and full attention of viewers, and they accomplish that in their site specific installation.


KT Duffy is a new media artist and educator from Chicago’s southwest side. They received their MFA in Interdisciplinary Art from the Maryland Institute College of Art in 2014 and is currently an Assistant Professor of Art and Technology at Northeastern Illinois University. They have most recently shown at the South Bend Museum of Art, (South Bend, IN), Terrault Gallery (Baltimore, MD), Mono8 Gallery (Manilla, Philippines), and as PIXELFACE at Comfort Station (Chicago, IL). They have been awarded residencies at The Vermont Studio Center (Johnson, VT), Latitude Chicago (Chicago, IL), ChaNorth (Pine Plains, NY), and Acre (Steuben, WI).